Roasted chicken with dijon sauce

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I just made this recipe for the first time a few days ago, and it was absolutely divine.  I shouldn’t be surprised – Smitten Kitchen is one of my very favorite food blogs.  The chicken itself is just amazing – if you simply wanted fried chicken, you could make it this way and skip the sauce.  The skin gets wonderfully cripsy, but you only use 1 Tbsp of oil and there is no breading at all.

Of course, me being me, I had to tweak the recipe just a bit. 😉  Although in this case, it was mostly out of necessity: our store was out of scallions when I was shopping, so I just decided to sub in my favorite veggie, mushrooms.  It worked out very well.

To do so, when I took the chicken out of the oven and removed it to a plate to start the sauce, I first tossed in 8 oz of sliced mushrooms and sauteed until they reduced, about 4 to 5 minutes.  Then I added the liquids and followed the rest of the directions as they were, although I did lengthen the boiling time after the cream was added to thicken up the sauce a bit, as she had suggested you could do.

Net carbs: 10g for whole recipe

Next time, I think I might just use 1 Tbsp of dijon.  Perhaps it just didn’t incorporate well b/c of the mushrooms, but the dijon flavor was quite distinct, and I would’ve preferred something a bit more subtle.

If you don’t like dijon at all, you could certainly just skip it.  I was thinking that if you sauteed up a bit of minced garlic along with the mushrooms (like I do with my Chicken and Mushroom Alfredo Bake) and then added some parmesan at the end, it would make an excellent garlic parmesan cream sauce as well.

Note: I bought a cooking wine without even looking at the label.  I’d calculated out the carbs for this recipe using my favorite source, the USDA Nutrient Database.  Unfortunately, cooking wine is apparently carbier (and higher in sodium) than drinking wine.  So next time, I’ll buy real wine.  If you’re a wine dunce like me and don’t know what kind of wine to get, I’ve been told chardonnay or pinot grigio/pinot gris qualify as dry, so they’d probably work well in this recipe.

Edited on 3/25/11 – I made this recipe again tonight, only this time I got good wine.  And I have to say – I didn’t really like it.  I actually boiled the sauce even longer this time, and maybe that concentrated the wine flavor, but it was just too heavy on the wine flavor for me.  I think next time I’d cut it down to 1/4 cup, but NOT replace it with more broth.  That would help thicken the sauce up more, too.

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